Graduate Students

Porsha Howell
Currently working with: Rozalyn Anderson
knmiller2@wisc.edu
Karl Miller
Currently working with: Rozalyn Anderson
Undergraduate Degree from: UW Madison
knmiller2@wisc.edu
Joshua Neuman
Currently working with: Michelle Kimple
In his current Ph.D work at UW, Josh is characterizing the importance of specific omega -3 and -6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and insulin secretion in type-2 diabetes.
jcneuman2@wisc.edu
Emily Sawin
Currently working with: Denise Ney
Undergraduate Degree from: College of Charleston
sawin@wisc.edu
Bridget Stroup
Currently working with: Denise Ney
Undergraduate Degree: UW-Madison
Bridget’s PhD work involves characterizing the clinical outcomes of the elemental amino acid diet compared with the glycomacropeptide diet in humans with PKU, in addition to how dietary protein source impacts bone, renal net acid excretion, and urinary calcium excretion in the PKU mouse model.
bstroup@wisc.edu
Sabrina Dumas
Currently working with: James Ntambi
sndumas@wisc.edu
Ting-Ni Huang
Currently working with: Eric Yen
Undergraduate degree: National Taiwan University
Ting-Ni is currently working on how lipid metabolism affects reproduction. Specifically, the role lipid synthesis enzyme, MGAT2, plays in embryo development, parturition, and lactation.
thuang46@wisc.edu
Elaina Jones
Currently working with: Guy Groblewski
Undergrad: The Ohio State University
Elaina’s research focuses on the pathobiology of pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer, specifically, how acinar cell differentiation impacts the early stages of pancreatic disease.  She is currently exploring the role of endosomal trafficking on maintenance of acinar differentiation.
ejones7@wisc.edu
Michelle Cooley
Currently working with: Guy Groblewski
Michelle’s research focuses on how the high rates of autophagy characteristic of secretory epithelial cells impact the development of disease in both intestinal and exocrine tissues. Her research has demonstrated that the regulatory protein D52 involved in secretion strongly interacts with the autophagy protein ATG16L1.  As ATG16L1 mutations are primary causes of inflammatory bowel diseases, and the inhibition of autophagy plays a critical role in the development of pancreatitis, understanding how D52 and the secretory pathway functionally impact cellular autophagy may provide therapeutic targets and strategies for treating these diseases.
koke@wisc.edu
Lexi Macmillan Uribe
Currently working with: Beth Olson
Lexi’s research focus is on maternal and infant nutrition education. Specifically, she is exploring new mothers’ healthy eating and exercise-related experiences and methods of delivering nutrition education in a family care practice. She hopes to develop and implement programs to improve maternal and child health in developing countries, be it through academia and/or a nonprofit organization.
macmillanuri@wisc.edu
Stephanie Mondloch
Currently working with: Sherry Tanumihardjo
Steph is exploring the possibility of using serum carotenoids as a biomarker for vitamin A status in certain populations. She is not yet sure what she would specifically like to do after receiving her degree, but she hopes to serve in a public health or health capacity.
smondloch@wisc.edu
Gretchen Seim
Currently working with: Rick Eisenstein
gseim@wisc.edu
Adrienne Cheng
Currently working with: Susan Smith
acheng23@wisc.edu
Lyanne Chin
Currently working with: HuiChuan Lai
Lyanne’s current research examines improvement of nutritional outcomes in the cystic fibrosis pediatrics population, particularly at fat-soluble vitamins levels. She hopes to pursue a career in academia.
lhchin@wisc.edu
Rachel Fenske
Currently working with: Michelle Kimple
The focus of Rachel’s research project is to elucidate the relationship between diet, specifically polyunsaturated fatty acids, and Type I Diabetes. Her plans following completion of her degree remain undetermined, but she hopes to combine her love of teaching and science in any future endeavors.
rjfenske@wisc.edu
Kiersten Olsen
Currently working with: Sherry Tanumihardjo
keolsen3@wisc.edu
Julie Patterson
Currently working with: Beth Olson
Julie’s research area is breastfeeding; specifically how we can extend breastfeeding rates, duration, and intensity of breastfeeding. Once she completes her PhD, her goal is to work in an academic setting where she can continue conducting research and serve as an instructor to teach others the principles of nutrition.
jpatterson5@wisc.edu
Michael Schaid
Currently working with: Michelle Kimple
mschaid@wisc.edu
Rachel Taylor
Currently working with: Roger Sunde
Rachel is working on selenium regulation and requirement in turkeys. After her degree she hopes to go into the animal feeds industry.
rtaylor4@wisc.edu